Garden State: Living Off the Land in Nineteenth-Century New Jersey

Sepia-toned 1880s photograph of view from a hill overlooking farmland. On the left and in the middle of the image, one can see rows of small haystacks. Beyond them is pasture and beyond that a farmhouse. From the lower right corner of the photograph, a road runs, separated from the field by a fence and occasional trees. The road follows a diagonal path, along the edge of the fields with the haystacks and pasture to the approximate center of the photo. On the right of the road, there are clusters of trees.
From page 17 of Doug Rauschenberger and Kathy Tassini’s Lost Haddonfield: “This view down Chews Landing Road towards Barrington was probably taken near the center of the present day Oak Avenue in an area then referred to as Goat Hill. Taken about 1886, this photograph shows the agricultural appearance which predominated in the vicinity in the late 19th century.”

Join us for a free virtual program, on January 17th at 7:00pm, for “Garden State: Living Off the Land in 19th Century New Jersey.”

Explore the agricultural history of New Jersey and its profound influence on farming today. This program will use the museum’s extensive collection of farming-related tools to bring to life this key aspect of New Jersey’s history. It also looks at what it was like to live and work on a 19th-century New Jersey farm.

Our presenter, Danielle Crigler, is a 21st-century educator with 8 years of social studies experience in urban and suburban schools. She has her master’s in Curriculum Development and has been the Curator of Education with the Museum of Early Trades & Crafts since 2021.

Sign up here to register and receive links to the program.

Early agricultural tools, including scythes and pitchforks, from the HSH museum collection. Photograph courtesy of Mike Underwood.
Early agricultural tools—including scythes and pitchforks—from the HSH museum collection. Photograph courtesy of Mike Underwood.
Ox yokes and collars from the HSH museum collection. Photograph courtesy of Mike Underwood.
Ox yokes and collars from the HSH museum collection. Photograph courtesy of Mike Underwood.